J160 nose wheel axl...
 
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J160 nose wheel axle removal

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degustibus
(@degustibus)
Active Member
Joined: 6 years ago
Posts: 4
Topic starter  

After 18 years and 1000 hours I would like to renew  the nose wheel tyre on  my J160, s/n 022. Might be time to renew the wheel bearings as well.

However the nose wheel axle bolt is well and truly  "frozen" to the aluminium axle - the bolt has never been removed since it was installed new in 2005.

Consequently I can't remove the wheel assembly from the nose leg.

Any suggestions as to ways and means of getting the wheel off  without having to cut anything?

Thanks

Max


   
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(@jabiru-support)
Member Admin
Joined: 4 years ago
Posts: 190
 

Don't know of any special techniques.  Soak with penetrating oil e.g WD40.  Use a punch and support the other side to drive it out.  Hope you can get it out without damaging anything. 


   
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degustibus
(@degustibus)
Active Member
Joined: 6 years ago
Posts: 4
Topic starter  

Replaced the axle bolt OK.

I made a press from 2 pieces of 40mm/side square steel tube, each 150 mm long. Each piece was drilled with 2 10mm holes right through to suit 10 mm threaded tension rods . These holes were symmetrically placed about 75 mm apart to allow the rods to pass through the wheel between spokes.  One steel tube was drilled centrally right through with a 1/4 inch drill . The other tube was also drilled centrally right through with a hole large enough to pass the head of an AN4 bolt - about  14mm diameter.

The press was fitted to the wheel by placing the tube with the 14 mm central hole over the head of the axle bolt. The other tube was fitted over the threaded end of the axle bolt and held in place by the tension rods.  An old AN4 bolt  through the central 1/4 inch holes  with  its head against the axle bolt threaded end transmitted press force.

Nuts on the tension rods were carefully and evenly tightened to apply press force to the axle bolt. After its threaded end had been driven flush with the wheel yoke, successively longer 1/4 inch drifts (made from old AN4 bolts with heads removed)  were fitted between the driving AN4 and the axle bolt threaded end, thus maintaining press  force on the axle bolt . The   tension rods were kept  tight  to maximise press force while supporting both yokes. Progress made is indicated by these rods becoming loose.

I used a small hammer and gentle tapping of the projecting  end of the driving AN4 plus liberal amounts of CorrosionX to keep  things moving. Application of heat from a hotair gun onto the spacer bearing hubs once or twice  helped somewhat. (Note that CorrosionX is petroleum based and inflammable.) After a while the driving AN4 was removed and a long drift  used in its place but still with the press in place and fully tightened.

It took a while but the process worked OK.

The axle bolt was corroded over about 25 mm from both ends. (Note to self: every 100 hours or so remove the bolt and apply CorrosionX - I don't want to have to go through the above performance  to change the nose wheel tube or tyre at some lonely airstrip out in the sticks.)

Max


   
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(@shawnk)
Active Member
Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 11
 

Posted by: @degustibus

It took a while but the process worked OK.

The axle bolt was corroded over about 25 mm from both ends. (Note to self: every 100 hours or so remove the bolt and apply CorrosionX - I don't want to have to go through the above performance  to change the nose wheel tube or tyre at some lonely airstrip out in the sticks.)

Max

I can imagine how much time you spent on this.
If you apply CorrosionX (or alternatives) every 100 hours, it will certainly keep rust away, but it will be time consuming.
The situation seems complicated. Maybe just use stainless steel bolts? Are there any of these available?

 


   
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